Blog

Bienvenue sur le blog de la communauté Instron. Vous y trouverez une compilation de sujets rédigés par nos experts les plus talentueux. Le monde des essais de matériaux est tellement vaste et concerne une telle diversité de secteurs industriels, de matériaux ou de défis, que le savoir dans ce domaine est nécessairement partagé. Ce sont donc tous nos collègues experts dans leurs domaines qui partagent ici leurs connaissances, leurs expériences et savoir-faire pour vous présenter les informations les plus précises, pertinentes et récentes.

N'hésitez pas vous aussi à nous dire qui vous êtes, à partager vos idées et expériences, ce blog est aussi le vôtre. Rejoignez notre communauté !

Tips and Tricks for Packaging Testing

Explore best practices to better provide quantitative information about tear resistance, puncture resistance, peel strength, heat seal strength, and durability of materials used in flexible and rigid packaging, and finished packaging products.

Posted On Nov 24, 2014 10:10 AM

Helping to Standardize High-Rate Testing of Composites

Instron has joined a new international group that is seeking to develop a best practice guide and test standards specifically for testing composites at high-strain rates.

As the automotive industry seeks ever-more-urgently to embrace composites, there is an increasing demand for testing composite material behavior at high-strain rates. The need for detailed data to inform crash simulation models first drove a renewed demand for equipment over the last 3 years, and now there is a need for international standardization in methodologies and data handling. The group’s aim is to facilitate generation and exchange of reliable and comparable test data in this highly challenging area.

Posted On Nov 21, 2014 10:10 AM

A Case for Extensometry

A universal testing system very simply measures 2 things during a basic mechanical test: force (via the load cell) and displacement (via the crosshead encoder). To obtain a basic stress-strain curve, you might think that’s all you need. With the force measurement from the load cell, the cross-sectional area of the material can be used to calculate stress; and with the crosshead extension, the original distance between the grips or fixtures can be used to calculate strain throughout the test. How simple!

Posted By Elena Mangano OnNov 14, 2014 10:10 AM

Question From a Customer: Air Bubbles in Extrudate

Q: We have an MF30 Melt Flow Indexer and started running tests on various polymers in our lab. Some of the samples have a lot of air bubbles in them. I believe this is contributing to inconsistencies in melt flow values. How do we minimize this?

A: There are a lot of reasons you could be seeing air bubbles in the filament sample. Ultimately, it comes down to keeping the testing and cleaning processes as consistent as possible.

Posted By Elena Mangano OnNov 05, 2014 10:10 AM

Challenges of Rigorous Demands

The world of materials testing is changing

  • materials are getting stronger, stiffer, and lighter
  • test standards are becoming stricter
  • testing labs are asked to perform more complex analytical tests

Posted By Leonardo Martinez OnNov 05, 2014 10:10 AM

4-Point Bend Testing of Carbon Fiber

Carbon fiber is an extremely strong material. Depending on the manufacturing process, this textile can have typical modulus values of about 138 Gpa and ultimate tensile strengths of about 3.5 Gpa. Industry professionals can find themselves seeking to replace traditional steel components with lighter carbon fiber counterparts to achieve a much higher stiffness to weight ratio. To determine the appropriate thickness for the corresponding carbon component, one must undergo some experimental validation.


Posted On Mar 25, 2014 10:10 AM

Charpy Impact Testing: Minimizing Hammer Changes

A common misconception within metals Charpy testing is that the specimen being tested must have an impact energy between 10% and 80% of the hammer capacity to be a standard compliant test. This is not true for metals tested to current common international standards such as ISO 148 and ASTM E23. This misconception sometimes comes from confusion with plastics standards (see ISO 179-1), other older metals standards (see GOST 9454-78), and historical use of a low resolution dial indicator on metals pendulum systems. Due to these misunderstandings, labs often have multiple systems or hammers for testing a range of specimen energies.

Posted On Mar 07, 2014 10:10 AM

What is N-value?

In one of our previous posts, we blogged about plastic strain ratio, r. Besides r-value, another parameter that is commonly measured in metals testing is the n-value. So what is n-value?

Posted On Jan 08, 2014 10:10 AM